Tag Archives: learning to write

Ep. 195: Toni Lopopolo

Workshop leader and literary agent Toni Lopopolo engages host Fred Klein in a discussion about twenty-first century writing. Lopopolo’s popular “Tea with Toni” writing workshops meet weekly in Carpinteria and…

Ep. 163: Toni Lopopolo

Literary agent and writing instructor Toni Lopopolo joins host Fred Klein to talk about 21st century writing, among other things. Ms Lopopolo will teach a Fiction Intensive with Shelly Lowenkopf,…

Ep. 45: Tea with Toni

Literary Agent and teacher, Toni Lopopolo, returns to update host Fred Klein about her ventures since relocating permanently to Santa Barbara. She is active seeking new clients as well as…

Ep. 27: Grace Rachow

Host Fred Klein chats with Grace Rachow about her extensive history in the writing community in Santa Barbara and her role as Volunteer Coordinator (a.k.a. Queen of the Universe) at…

writing good beginnings to stories

How to Write Great Beginnings for Your Stories

The beginning of a new year is a good time to think about how we begin our stories. When you pick up a novel or short story where do you…

Writing Better Dialogue

Writing better dialogue starts with character development. What does their voice quality and style of speech tell your readers about the character? Now think about their educational background, favorite subject,…

Your Character’s Point of View

Once you’ve fleshed out your characters you have to decide how to tell the story. Whose eyes will the reader see through and how much information will they get? This…

Creating Living, Breathing Characters

When asked what makes a story tick, Jack Canfield, co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul books, said he’s noticed a common tread. “More dialogue and more character development….

Improve Your Writing

It is rumored that James Joyce worked on one sentence in Finnegan’s Wake for fourteen years. We don’t need to go that far, but a polished story is the editor’s…

How To Start A Writers Group

Creative writing courses and conferences are all well and good, but a close-knit group can provide the support we need to grow as writers.